Boris to Win 43 Seat Majority Says Meta-Poll

You’ve heard of meta-analyses, where academics who can’t be bothered to do their own research just nick everyone else’s hard work, crunch the numbers a bit, and come out with a super-accurate result? Well here is our META-POLL. After much reading of the papers, surfing the net, and even talking to people, we have concluded that the Tory party will win. (Bet you saw that coming eh?)

Why do we think that?

  1. Farage folded, as predicted here recently, avoided splitting the leave vote, and crowned the Tories as winners

  2. The Labour manifesto was written to appeal to hard-line left wingers – who would have voted for Jeremy anyway. Only the naïve or those too young to remember the 1970s could think that nationalisation is the answer. (See our earlier report on rail user numbers pre- and post – nationalisation). The “free” broadband idea went down well, but the practicalities are horrible. By the time it is built, at five times the original cost, technology will have made it obsolete. And the big beneficiaries will be the farmers and isolated rural communities – who will not be voting Labour under any circumstances. Meanwhile, their fence-sitting on Brexit feels a bit like “Follow Me….. I don’t know where we are going, but Follow Me!”

  3. The Liberal Democrats have shown themselves to be neither liberal nor democratic. Their reverse Article 50 campaign can only appeal to the most die-hard europhiles. Meanwhile, Jo Swinson has not done well. Her claims to be PM in waiting invite the retort that she’ll be waiting a very long time.

  4. The Tories have avoided a May-style manifesto-suicide-note. Divisive figures such as Rees-Mogg have been kept out of the limelight. Boris himself has picked his battles carefully, with more to lose than win.

So what happens now?

There are still considerable risks for Mr Johnson. Will the left-leaning students be too busy recovering from their end-of-term parties to vote?

Students preparing to oversleep and miss voting

Just how many people were too embarrassed to tell pollsters that they would vote Tory (but will anyway)? Will tactical voting have any impact? Will Mr Trump try to intervene? He is not great at keeping his thoughts to himself is he? That could hurt Boris. In this last week, we expect the Tories to try to refocus on Brexit as the major issue – and Labour to try to talk about virtually anything else!

What does it all mean for Asset Prices?

The market had a lost year in 2019, with too much uncertainty. A Tory win is about 70% baked into the market, so we expect a moderate bounce on 13 December. This will be most pronounced for the likes of BT and other nationalisation victims. Despite longer term trading arrangements still being in the air, we feel that 2020 will turn into a log bull run for equities and commercial property, as investors get back to the serious business of making money.

Please follow and like us:

Farage Must Fold

Gosh, there are so many pics out there of Mr Farage with a pint!

Much as we admire Nigel Farage’s consistency in supporting his cause, his present political positioning is just madness.

Clearly, he could never have thought that Boris would tear up his deal just because it is not No Deal – which seems to be Farage’s target, So what does Nigel want? Most Brexiteers can live with Boris’ deal – and many remainers can live with the withdrawal, as it least it isn’t a crash, and it moves the topic on. The Brexit Party have no chance of power, and in many close marginals, they risk drawing just enough voters away from the Tories to gift the seat to Labour or the Liberals.

Just as in Peterborough and Brecon by-elections, they could well split the leave vote, and let one of the other parties to win, with many fewer than half of the votes cast. Does Nigel really want to be the man who let Jeremy Corbyn into Number 10? We think not. So the only conclusion is that he thinks there may be a peerage in it for him if he backs down. There can be no other logical motivation for Mr Farage to take such an extreme position.

Our Forecast

The Brexit Party will withdraw from all seats except those where the Tories have no chance anyway – ie Northern Labour-held seats. Nigel will magnanimously agree to back Boris’s deal as being better than any of the plausible alternatives. In due time, Mr Farage will enter the House of Lords.

Lord Farage of England! You heard it here first.

Please follow and like us:

What is Boris’s Plan for Brexit?

We are three weeks away from Brexit Day, and yet there is no clarity. This is starting to look eerily familiar!

Boris; buffoon or battler?

We have a PM who is trapped in office, but with no majority he is completely powerless. Meanwhile, the opposition is scared of an election, and is rather enjoying the discomfort of Boris.

It seems that the key date will be 19 October, a week on Saturday, the day when Boris is legally ordered by Parliament to write the letter asking for an extension.

Leo Varadker, Irish Taoiseach

Will he do it? We think not. Since the Benn Act (aka the Surrender Act) was rushed through, Boris has been at pains not to retreat from his ‘do or die’ message about 31 October. We can see why he would do that as background to his negotiations. If EU actually thought he could push through No Deal, then they would be much more keen to negotiate. This has to be true of Leo Varadker, Irish Taoiseach, who has most to lose from a No Deal. Clearly, they have not bought into that idea though.

 

How can these facts co-exist;-

  1. Boris claims we will leave on 31 October, deal or no deal,

  2. The Benn Act says he must ask for an extension in the event of no deal

  3. The Conservatives have stated that they will not break the law

  4. A deal looks extremely unlikely

  5. The EU will agree to any extension request

  6. Parliament will not let BoJo call a quick election?

It seems Boris must believe that there is a mechanism to spring free from the trap. Here is what we think could happen (yep, “could” implies our low level of confidence in our prediction).

The Queen’s Speech next week will essentially be the Conservative manifesto for an autumn election. It will get voted down, but still the opposition will not allow an election.

The big day will be 19 October, in the special Saturday Parliamentary session called by the Government. We see the following votes;-

  1. A vote to lift the Benn Act and allow a No Deal to happen. This will be designed and phrased in terms of progressing or overturning the referendum result, to try to make the opposition look like it is ignoring the plebiscite. Narrowly, we think this will be voted down.

  2. A vote to call a General Election. This will be designed to make the opposition look like it is scared of facing the electorate, especially given that they have earlier voted to “ignore the referendum”.

  3. This is when Boris Johnson resigns as Prime Minister, and where he states that he will not do the usual caretaking role until a new one is appointed. We feel that BoJo has too much political capital tied up to write that letter. It would be interesting if Parliament voted to make him personally write a letter in which he does not  believe. If he does not resign, I see him taking a jail sentence as less politically damaging than writing a letter.

  4. If we have no Prime Minister – and hence no Government – then there will inevitably be a court case as to who can write the letter.

  5. Then there is 14 days for a new Government to be formed. We do not think Mr Corbyn could attract enough support, as the LibDems will see little advantage of positioning themselves as Labour’s poodle.

  6. A government of “National Unity”, which even the media have Christened “National Remainers” also seems unlikely, given how the various factions of the remainers struggle to agree on anything.

  7. Another Conservative would be the natural choice, as they have the largest party…. could that be dragged out for the remaining 12 days?

  8. So we drift towards 31 October……. no Prime Minister, no Government, political chaos.

  9. Away from Westminster, the negative respect for the political classes plumbs new depths.

When the referendum result was declared, the best outcome would have been a clear, firm date three years (or even five years) ahead, for which everyone could plan and prepare, leading to the most seamless transition possible. Instead of which the political classes in London, Brussels and Dublin have screwed it up right royally. By their constant bickering and game-playing, we are now in the worst possible situation. It is no wonder that the general public is coming to despise politicians.

 

Oh, and as for the details of Boris’s Plan, we don’t know.  We’re not even sure that he knows……

Please follow and like us: